Postcards

These are all my own cards, having been bought at fairs or at auctions. All of the pre-war items are probably quite unique – I have certainly never seen any of them anywhere else.

* N.B. ALL of the items below – without the watermark – are available as electronic scans and can be sent by email at a larger size for a sensible donation *


Anonymous postcard, c1914
1914 Player group

A group of Town players in their ‘civvies’. This must be one of the very first photos of a very young Billy Smith.
I believe the players to be (from left) …
Horace Hussler – Goalkeeper signed in August 1912 from Sheffield Wednesday and released in July 1913 but re-signed for 1913-14 season; joined Doncaster Rovers in July 1914; Sidney James – Joined from Bird-In-The-Hand FC in November 1913 and was killed in action in spring, 1917; Norman Holmes – Full-back from Clapton Orient in July 1913; went on to play three games at fullback 1913-14; left for York City in July 1914; Frank Mann – Signed from Aston Villa in July 1912 and moved to Man Utd in March 1923; Billy Smith – Signed October 1913 and played until July 1934; Ralph Rodgerson – Full-back who came from Burnley in January 1913 and moved to Leeds Utd in March 1921; Harry Linley – Half-back from Silverwood Colliery in August 1912; moved to Halifax Town in July 1921. All of which, I believe, points to a 1914 date for this postcard.


Anonymous postcard, 1922
1922 BrightonIn 1922, Town played at Brighton in a 2nd Round F. A. Cup tie, on their way to the victorious final against Preston North End. The game, played on 28th January, was a 0-0 draw, with Town going on to win the replay 2-0. This postcard shows hundreds of Brighton fans crammed cheek by jowl, and incredibly, there are hats as far as the eye can see. I’ve looked very hard, and cannot find one face without a hat! There are at least four women in here, a few sailors and several soldiers too! Handwritten pencil notes on the back identify the date of the game, the score, and the attendance of 22,241.


Anonymous photograph, c1922
1922 TramI am almost certain that this photograph is from 1922 and that the tram was decorated to celebrate the FA Cup win against Preston North End. The Town anthem ‘SMILE AWHILE’ was a hit in this year, and the slogan ‘NOW TOWN’ was used in programmes of the 1922 season.
(This postcard has been reproduced on page 79 of ‘100 Years : All That’s Worth Knowing; Facts & Photos’)


Anonymous photograph, c1922
1920s TramWhilst the image quite obviously is from the 1920s this most certainly isn’t an original postcard from that era; in fact, it would appear to be much more recent and I’d hazard a guess at 1960s. It bears a large rubber-stamped mark on the back which has been clearly produced for a collector of tram and bus photographs as it has ‘tick-boxes’ for ‘System’, Car No.’, ‘Class’, Gauge’, etc. etc. If I was pushed, I’d say that this is the reverse side of the tram shown above; the positioning of the illuminated star and crown at the top and bottom of the front match, as do the smaller stars and shield on the top deck. There also seem to be frills above the bogeys which match and finally the style of writing looks exactly the same. If all of this is correct, then I believe that this would again be the tram celebrating Town’s only FAC Final success of 1922.


East Pennine T. G. (R. Marshall collection) postcard, 1922
1922 TrolleybusAn excellent view of the decorated omnibus used to transport the players back from the railway station after the FA Cup win of 1922 (Town beat Preston 1-0 in the last Cup Final to be staged at Stamford Bridge before the move to Wembley the following year.)
Whilst ‘BRAVO TOWN’ is evident on the front, not very clear across this near side top, are the words “1920 SMILE AWHILE; 1922 STILL SMILING”.
(This postcard has been reproduced on page 37 of ’99 Years & Counting: Stats and Stories’)


Anonymous postcard, 1922
1922 Trolleybus 2This is actually a print from the original postcard; I couldn’t persuade the owner to sell me the original! It looks like the reverse side of the trolleybus to the previous one. Although ‘BRAVO TOWN’ is still easily visible on the front, the upper deck slogan on this side reads ‘VICTORY WELL EARNED’. It most definitely is the same trolleybus; the registration number on both is CX 2454.


Anonymous postcard, 1922
1922 Cup Comes HomeTom Wilson holds firmly onto the FA Cup whilst also shaking the hand of the Deputy-Mayor of Huddersfield. This photograph was taken after the victorious Town team had arrived back in Huddersfield and taken the trolleybus ride from the station. Also to be seen are Jack Chaplin (half of him, anyway), Herbert Chapman, Harry Brough, Billy Smith (in the large hat at the back), Colin McKay, Willie Watson, Charlie Slade and George Richardson. In addition that’s club chairman Joseph Barlow between the Deputy-Mayor and Watson. I’ll name the others when I can identify them.


Anonymous photograph, c1924-25
1924 Bus QueueHand-written in fading black ink on the back of this photographic card are the words “Huddersfield Corporation Football Cars in Northumberland St. (G .P. O. right)” and the date ’24 or 25′ is written in pencil beneath that. The photograph itself shows a sign declaring ‘QUEUE HERE FOR CARS TO THE FOOTBALL MATCH LEEDS ROAD’
It’s a nice little image of Town fans – and not exclusively blokes! – queuing for the ‘Football Special’ tram cars on a match day.

 

 

 


Anonymous postcard, c1926
1926 Cowshed End

Photographed prior to the erection of the barrel-style wooden roof ‘Cowshed’ end at Leeds Road, we see a collection of gentlemen – and, presumably, their offspring – filling the goalmouth. As the Cowshed was put up in the summer of 1929, we can guess that this date might be correct.
It has been suggested that 4th from the left is J. H. Rayner, a Town Director and former referee, but this is not confirmed and I am, as yet, unable to identify anyone else on this postcard.


Anonymous photograph, 1926
1926 Tram

An unusual real photographic postcard in that it shows tram number 78 decked out in celebration NOT of Town’s Triple Championship success of 1926, but that of the Reserve Team, who won the Central League Championship in the same year. ‘BRAVO TOWN’ is again evident on the top deck, with the ‘Stiffs’ success denoted below.


Anonymous photograph, 1926
1926 TramcarAs with the trolleybus photographs above from 1922, this item is only a print from an original. And, as with the trolleybus, it looks like the reverse view of the postcard above that I actually do possess. From this it would seem clear that the tram WAS decorated to celebrate the double success of Town’s first team and the Reserves, both of whom won their respective leagues in 1926, with the first team completing an altogether more splendid achievement …


F. Szanto postcard, 1928
1928 FAC Final

German-produced postcard featuring the players involved in the 1928 FA Cup Final, namely Town and Blackburn Rovers. A piece of paper glued to the back bears the following text: “Das Ereignis im englischen fussballsport: Die im Endspiel um den Cup Final am 21.4 beschäftigten Mannschaften, Huddersfield Town und Blackburn Rovers.” which roughly translates as “The crowning glory of English football. The game of the Cup Final
on 21st April. Finalists are Huddersfield Town and Blackburn Rovers. There is a second piece of paper attached with the text ‘Copyright by F. Szanto, Presse Photo Verlag, Budapest, Erzsebet Körut 23’.


Cliff’s “Non-Tear” GLOBE Footballs (c1931)
1931 Globe FootballsThis rare anonymous postcard features captains shaking hands from four consecutive F. A. Cup Finals and Town feature in two of them. Blackburn Rovers captain Harry Healless shakes hands with Clem Stephenson in the top left picture, whilst below that at bottom left, Tom Wilson shakes hands with Arsenal captain Tom Parker in 1930. Strangely enough, that’s former Town player Ned Barkas as captain of Birmingham City shaking hands with the WBA captain in 1931 too/

 

 

 


Anonymous German postcard, 1938
1938 GermanThe England team that played Germany, featuring Town players Ken Willingham and Alf Young. The game was a friendly match played played on 14th May 1938 at the Olympiastadion, Berlin. England proved victorious by 6-2 and both Ken Willingham and Alf Young played, although neither player was amongst the goals. This match is remembered as much for the England team’s rending of the Nazi salute during pre-game ceremonies in Berlin’s packed Olympiastadion as it is for the result, a thumping for the Nazi regime’s sporting pride and joy. Before the match (at the direction of the British Ambassador to Germany, Sir Neville Henderson, and with the support of Football Association Secretary Stanley Rous, who would serve as FIFA President from 1961 to 1974) the England players joined in the Nazi raised-arm salute as the German national anthem was played and Nazi leaders Göring, Goebbels, Hess and von Ribbentrop watched. What further increases the value of this item is the fact that it is postmarked the very day of the game, ’14-5-38 Berlin-Charlottenburg’.


And now, a couple of strange ones!

Two lovely views of Trieste in Italy, but these are no ordinary tourist postcards – they were written by former Town player Alf Lythgoe to two budding footballers back in dear old Blighty!

1940s Lythgoe1 front   1940s Lythgoe1 back

That first one, addressed to Master Kenneth Duff, reads …
“Dear Kenneth,
Many thanks for your interesting letter. Do you think you could find me one of those cigarette card photos of me and give it to Sam to send to me so that I may show it to the boys here. I am trying to teach 80 boys how to play football in the English manner. There are no crows or sparrows here but grey wood-pidgeons (sic) fly around my house all day.
Best wishes
A. P. Lythgoe”

1940s Lythgoe2 front   1940s Lythgoe2 back

This second postcard is addressed to Master Albert Lea, and reads …

“Dear Albert,
Many thanks for your letter and I hope you succeed in your ambition to become a prominent footballer. But remember, that, the same as a Top-class musician you must learn the fundamentals first. The boys here are full of enthusiasm but the grounds they play on are not conductive (sic) to good football. Most of them are built from Quarries and with so many matches being played on them , they are down to their rock bases almost. 110 teams share 5 grounds in this area. The first match on each Sunday starts at round 8 AM and matches follow continually all day long.
Best wishes,
A. P. Lythgoe”

The fact that there is no postmark, stamp or even completed address on either postcard suggests that neither was ever actually posted. I also presume that Lythgoe must have been retired out in Italy when these postcards were written; he left Town in late1938 to return to Stockport County from whence he had come in the first place. He left there in 1939 and then went on to manage Altrincham in the non-league in 1953-1955, so perhaps these cards date from soon after then? Or perhaps in the 1939-1953 period? He died in 1967, aged 60.

(I am greatly indebted to Dawn Melsom for sending me these unique postcards.)


Nostalgia Postcard Collector’s Club, Iris Publishing Ltd. 1990 (Set 1)
1943 Matthews

March 1943: “Stanley Matthews seen here in action playing for the R.A.F. [against the Civil Defence in the first round of the Inter-Allied Services Cup at Leeds Road]. “The best footballer the war has produced” according to the Press. He went on to become one of the legends of the game, eventually to be knighted in recognition of his sportsmanship as well as his technical brilliance.”


Stuart Clarke ‘The Homes Of Football’ series, 1991

1991 Homes of Football Southend

304. “The Lone Huddersfield Supporter”
Southend United 1991.
Hmmm … I’m not sure that I believe this one at all!


The Nostalgia Postcard Collectors Club, ​Iris Publishing Ltd. 1991 (Set 14).

1935 Brentford

There are plenty of these knocking about on on eBay for a couple of pounds. Not strictly speaking a Town postcard, but it features a crowd watching Town!
“Brentford ,1935 ​Football between the ​wars was absorbed into the national culture through newspaper, newsreel and radio coverage. It became one of the most popular
national spectator sports, with a weekly flutter on the football pools one of the most popular forms of gambling. This photograph was taken in August 1935 where Brentford was playing at home to Huddersfield.”


Dawn Cover Productions, 1993
1993 Dawn Covers train

The painting shows Ex-LNER Locomotive B17 No. 61653 named “Huddersfield Town” passing close to Leeds Road ground, the home of Huddersfield Town AFC from 1910 to 1994. One of a batch of locomotives named after Football Clubs, “Huddersfield Town” entered service in April 1936 and was withdrawn in January 1960. This is No. 13 in a series of paintings featuring Locomotives named after Football Clubs. The first edition is limited to 5000 postcards. Artwork by G. S. Cooper, Transport Artist.


Stuart Clarke

1993 Homes of Football Leeds Road

‘The Homes Of Football’ series, 1993
1096. “Leeds Road At Twilight”
Huddersfield Town 1993.


Anonymous, 1994

1994 End of an Era

“The End of an Era: 1908 – 1994” Aerial view; Leeds Road Stadium, Huddersfield. Home of Huddersfield AFC 1908-1994, this postcard was almost certainly published by the club itself as part of the ‘End of an Era’ merchandising drive, or could it have been an insert in one of the First Day Covers which celebrated our last game?


Stuart Clarke

1994 Homes of Football Two Grounds

‘The Homes Of Football’ series, 1994
1416. “New Home On The Horizon”: Huddersfield Town 199


Anonymous postcard, c1994

1994 Anonymous

The new Alfred McAlpine Stadium, which has now staged its first games. It was opened in August 1994. Stadium final completion: 1995.”


Dawn Cover Productions, 1995
1995 Dawn Covers

The painting shows the new Alfred McAlpine Stadium where Huddersfield Town play. The Stadium was officially opened on 5th August 1995 when Huddersfield Town (just promoted) played Blackburn Rovers, the FA Carling Premiership Champions.
This is No. 2 in a series of paintings featuring different clubs, events and celebrities in Football. The first edition is limited to 5000 postcards and I’m pretty certain that it was included in the First Day Cover for this specific event.
Artwork by G. S. Cooper.


Huddersfield Town A. F. C.
​A series of four postcards produced to celebrate the Millennium through Town’s history. These really are quite rare nowadays and they never ever appear on places like eBay. And the dreaded Denis Law mis-spelling rears it’s ugly head once again.

1999 HTAFC11999 HTAFC21999 HTAFC31999 HTAFC4


Huddersfield Daily Examiner postcard
1995 Huddersfield Examiner

“The Alfred McAlpine Stadium”
The date is probably 1994-96 as there is no Panasonic stand at the northern end of the ground. In addition, the ground changed its name in 2004.


Anonymous German postcard, 2007

2007 German

“Huddersfield (England) Alfred McAlpine Stadium”
Sportplatz und Stadionansichtskarten 2007. Foto: Privatarchiv Rieger.


Anonymous postcard

2005 Anonymous

“Huddersfield The Galpharm Stadium”
No other details whatsoever, but the date must be after July 31st 2004, as that’s when the stadium changed its name from the McAlpine.


 

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